Kathryn Joseph puts the weight and pain of abuse under scrutiny on her quietly fearsome new record. She tells Alan Pedder how she turned her rage into a source of comfort.

Once a discouraged, subterranean thing, women’s anger has finally gone mainstream after centuries of censorship. It’s been a beautiful, painful, and inspiring thing to witness. ​ With her third album, for you who are the wronged, Kathryn Joseph lets the rage she carries flow through the heart of its coded…

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With her third album Emotional Eternal ushering in a more peaceful, uplifting era, Melody Prochet takes Alan Pedder on an introspective trip through the songs that brought her here. 

There’s a line from the first Melody’s Echo Chamber album where French psych-pop voyageuse Melody Prochet confesses “in the calm I find my truth”. Ten years on, that same principle bears some pretty heavenly fruit with Emotional Eternal, a more grounded and complete record than what has come before. Only…

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As we start to adjust to life in the absence of pandemic restrictions, Jasleen Dhindsa looks at some of the challenges faced by artists living with the added weight of autoimmune conditions – and what can be done to help them.

As a home for those that don’t fit in, the music industry is an industry that prides itself on being different - embracing individuals with personal struggles, promoting diversity and inclusion every step of the way, and even capitalising on it during the process. Despite this almost pathological need for…

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The Regrettes embrace their love of pop on Further Joy

The Regrettes’ sophomore album – garage rock inspired How Do You Love? – was released in the second half of 2019, but for obvious reasons the following year meant a prolonged period of separation for the band. Finally reconvening, twelve months later and out in the Californian desert, Further Joy…

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Placebo are both timely and timeless on Never Let Me Go

Not so different as to be unrecognisable however. Never Let Me Go is the band's eighth studio album, and whilst frontman Brian Molko's idiosyncratic vocal is welcomingly recognisable, the rest of the record offers up a refreshingly new take on their tried and tested brand of alt-rock. And well it…

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